Several sites strive to celebrate April Fool's

AddThis

View of the UT Tower from the April Fool's Day 8-bit version of Google Maps (Photo Courtesy of Google Maps).
View of the UT Tower from the April Fool's Day 8-bit version of Google Maps (Photo Courtesy of Google Maps).

In what has become a sort of Internet tradition, popular sites across the Web played April Fools’ Day pranks on their users. The tomfoolery varied in scope and cleverness, but few sites failed to sneak their own little joke in.

Google stole the show, with nearly every branch of the site seeming to have its own dedicated joke. Google Maps introduced a new platform to its arsenal: the original 8-bit Nintendo Entertainment System. Curious users could trial the “Quest Mode” on the maps page, which rendered the world accurately in amusingly dated 2-D graphics. Google’s Chrome browser trotted out a multitask feature where you can use two mice at once to double your productivity.

Not to be outdone, Google’s child company, YouTube, introduced a feature long in-demand: the ability to order the entire “YouTube Collection” of videos on DVD, so that when your Internet connection goes down yet again, you won’t have to wait for it to come back to see your favorite funny cat videos.

Funny cats were also the subject of Kodak’s and AdBlock’s pranks. Kodak offered a new “print-a-kitten” kiosk, while AdBlock, rather than making ads disappear, replaced them with pictures of adorable cats.

Popular content-sharing website Reddit introduced a Facebook-esque “Timeline” feature, where users could see Reddit posts from the distant past — and the future. ThinkGeek brought out a series of new “products” including an Admiral Ackbar Singing Bass, a Game of Thrones Fire and Blood Perfume and more.

Disappointing though it may be to realize these features aren’t real, the Internet’s efforts to one-up itself in silliness and humor at each April’s start are ceaselessly amusing.